How to Read the Xtra Math Parent Report

Beginning this week, parents will periodically receive a copy of their child’s basic math facts progress. This report is generated from Xtra Math, the online math facts practice program students are using in class. There are several components to the parent report that you will want to be familiar with.

Daily Usage Icons

Found on the calendar at the top of the parent report, these icons indicate the quality of a student’s performance for a specific day or activity. 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mastery Score

The mastery score–the green number on the top right hand side of the chart section (see image)–should be interpreted as a completion percentage for an operation. For example, a mastery score of 75 means the student is about three quarters of the way toward finishing the operation. It should not be viewed as a grade (90% = A, etc). It is common for students to start out with a mastery score well below 30 and take several weeks to finish an operation.

The score is calculated as a weighted percentage where easy facts such as +0, +1, ×0, ×1 are weighted less than more difficult facts. Mastery scores are based solely on the results of quiz activities and are not affected by performance during practice activities. In order to get a mastery score of 100, a student needs to have answered every question correctly within three seconds in at least two out of the last three times they have attempted it.

The Progress Graph

The progress graph shows how the student’s mastery score has changed over time. Each point on the graph represents a day that the student did a quiz in XtraMath. The height of the point indicates the mastery score after that day’s quiz, and the color of the point indicates the quality of the student’s performance on the quiz. These colors correspond with the usage icons on the right side of the class report, and the colored dates on the student report’s calendar, and are explained in our icon guide.

The class report shows a miniature version of the same graph, called a “sparkline,” for each student’s current operation.

The Mastery Matrix

The mastery matrix is a color-coded representation of a student’s current mastery of an operation. Each square represents a single problem, like 2 × 4, and the color of that square indicates how well the student knows the answer.

How to Help

Students work on building their math fact fluency daily–both in Xtra Math and through math centers during our daily math block. There are lots of ways to help at home, too, so that your child can more quickly and efficiently master their basic math facts, making math computation so much easier! Here’s a list of ways you can help:

  • Flash Cards
  • Verbally ask your student to answer basic math facts during wait times (driving in the car, waiting at the doctor’s office, cooking dinner)
  • Do an extra round of Xtra Math at home at night or on weekends
  • Play board games that use math facts or use flash cards to “earn a turn”–a correct answer to the flashcard earns a turn and an incorrect answer means they lose a turn
  • Use a deck of playing cards to play speed (place two cards on the table and have the child add/subtract/multiply the two numbers within 3 seconds to keep the cards. Player at the end with the most cards wins.)

If you have additional concerns or questions, feel free to contact me so that we can problem solve more ways to help your child.

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